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How to photograph your baby

Many new parents take hundreds of photos of their new baby within the first few months of their life, but it can be disappointing when the results are not quite what you hoped for.

Baby photoSo how do you take that perfect photo, one that you can send to family and friends for Christmas, print on a canvas or simply hang on the wall in a beautiful frame. As a parent and a photographer l love taking photos of babies, and these are my ten top tips to help you take perfect pictures of your cherub.

  1. Make as much use of natural light as possible, photograph your baby in good natural light, in a bright room with lots of windows, or next to a window. Avoid direct sunlight.
  2. Make sure the room is slightly warmer than usual if you would like them to stay still for longer than usual and maybe without blankets
  3. Use the largest image size setting on your camera so that you can edit your photo and crop it for the best composition
  4. Think about the background, clear away any clutter in the background so that the focus is on your baby.
  5. Follow your baby's lead, look to see what mood are they in, and let them direct the photos, are the sleepy, hungry, playful? Use their mood to set the tone of the photo. A sleeping baby looks angelic asleep on their favourite blanket or you might get smiles if they are playing with their favourite toy.
  6. Keep it fun, play some nice music, have their favourite toys to hand, smile at them and keep your lood upbeat, play with them.
  7. Grab their attention with squeaky toys, funny noises and laughs, or sooth them with relaxing sounds.
  8. Try to take the picture when they are looking directly at the camera, these images are often the photos that parents love the most.
  9. Take lots of photos and then edit them afterwards, babies have a habit of moving just when you don't want them to, so its easier to delete blurry ones.
  10. Keep the session short, finish as soon as they've had enough so that they enjoy it and you can do another one soon. Give them lots of praise.

Phew, and well done to you, it can be hard work and take lots of energy but I'm sure you'll pleased with the results.

Lucy Kane is Creative Director at Time & Leisure and an artist, designer and photographer

Visit her website